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Written and idea by Virago. You may use it personally, but ask for permission first if you want to use it on your site AND CREDIT ME!

Introduction

You don't have a fancy-pants expensive table nor a even more expensive image program, but you always wanted to have nice and straight and evenly thick and decent inking/lines, but you make a mess with the ink or you cannot draw well with the mouse? This tuturial can teach you how to 'ink' in MS Paint. How? That is explained step by step in this tutorial. Of course it will require a bit of practise, but it will work ;)

Before we get started, there are two ways I find handy to sketch to get the proportions right. One is that you sketch on paper. Two is that you do it in MS Paint. You can also use other image-programs of course to sketch. In step one is explained for each way how to get started before you actually go inking. Steps 2 and further it doesn't matter whether you have sketched on paper or on the computer.

Step one: the sketch
Step two: the inking
Step three: the coloring

Note: This all may look a lot, but it isn't. I'm not good at writing tutorials, so I've explained thoroughly... Perhaps a bit too thoroughly ^^"".

Step one: the sketch

Sketched on paper: When you have finished the sketch on paper, either scan big (about 3 times as big as how big you want the pic eventually to be), or scan decently big and resize about 3 times bigger than the size you want the image to be. In step 3 it will be explained why so big. Make sure the lines are dark. If they are light try to change the contrast (more) and brightness. If you have Adobe Photo Shop, you could also use the sharpen-tool.
Save and open in MS Paint or copy the whole image (Ctrl+A & Ctrl+C) into MS Paint. When that is done, save as in a mono bmp-file, meaning only black and white (no greys). This should give you a matrix (it is called that way :P). Then save as into 16bit bmp-file. You can save in a higher resolution, but it's not necessary (especially handy if your computer isn't fast). Then right click on a light color (I always use light grey). Cut the whole image (Ctrl+A & Ctrl+X) and right-click black. Then paste the image (Ctrl+V). Make sure you have the thingie showed to the right on the lowest and deselect. Now you are ready to start inking. To step two: the inking.

Sketch in MS Paint: Open a 16bit bmp. Make the image-area about 3 times bigger than you want the image to be. click on a light color (I usually use light grey) and use the -tool with for thin lines thickness 2 pixels, "normal" 3 pixels and thick lines 4 or 5 to draw (if you don't know how to use it well, click here). If you prefer to use guidelines, draw them first and use another color to draw the lines for the ketch itself in another color. Then right click the same color of the guidelines, cut the whole image (Ctrl+A & Ctrl+X), right click white and paste the image (Ctrl+V). Make sure you have the lowest thingie on shown to the right of the "sketch on paper". To step two: the inking.

To top | intro | step 2 | step 3

Step two: the inking

Now that you have the sketch done (which is in a light color now). You can start the inking. Use the -tool for this and the straight line for straight lines, but no line is actually straight in reality, lol. For thin lines you use a thickness 2 pixels, "normal" 3 pixels and thick lines 4 or 5. If you think the sketch you made is well enough, you right-click on the same color the lines are of the sketch. Cut the whole image (Ctrl+A & Ctrl+X) and right-click black. Then paste the image (Ctrl+V). Make sure you have the thingie showed to the right on the lowest and deselect.

Go over the sketch, until you've done every line. If you don't know how to use the bended line-tool well, it is explained below here.

The bended line-tool

I bet you think it's a stupid tool, which is hard to use. I thought so too, but there some tricks to use it easier. You need some judging-skills though, but further it's easy once you know them. For all shapes it is important to put the start of the line on the place where you start and the end where you have to/want to end. Quite obvious, lol. Next, I'll show you how to do certain shapes.

Quarter of a circle/oval

Click the mouse and drag to the end and let go. (I started right-top). Then more to the top (about 1/4 of the line) drag the line towards where the line is going to bend to. Make sure you have about as much area between the line and the line where it eventually should be in the first half and as in the last half. Then drag about 3/4 of line so that the line goes to stand on the right place.

Sharp curvy bend

Click the mouse and drag to the end and let go. (I started left-bottom). Then more to the top (about 1/4 of the line) drag the line towards where the line is going to bend to. Make sure you have more space on one side of the line than the other. Then drag about 3/4 of line so that the line goes to stand on the right place.

Curly bend

Click the mouse and drag to the end and let go. (I started right-top). Depending on how small you want the first bend to be (the bigger the further away from the start of the line) drag it away. After that do the other part the other way. The further you drag the line away (booth side) the bigger it becomes and the more sharper it curves.

Turned circle

Before you start with a circle (mind you, not a perfect circle, but a 3D circle), you cannot make a full circle with one bended line. The circle would look very weird, lol. You have to use 2 lines. It's best to use 3 lines or even 4 lines. Best is to combine the bends I just showed you to get it.

To top | intro | step 1 | step 3

Step three: the coloring

No, this is not a step to color in MS Paint or something like that. It's how you can start coloring and about why you needed to make the image so big. In case you wonder why you did have to make that inking so big, here's the big secret about it: it's because it you keep it small and don't resize, the lines don't look smooth. If you resize it, it looks smooth. I bet ya didn't think of that XD.

So, when the inking is done, you can either resize it (33% or so, depending how much you resized) to original size and color it or use the big size to color and then resize 33% or so, depending how much you resized.

To top | intro | step 1 | step 2

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